Ploting vs. Pantsing by Maggie Mundy with a Giveaway

Welcome author, Maggie Mundy!

Be sure to scroll down and read all about Maggie's book, Unknown Protector, and enter our giveaway.


Plotting or pantsing.

It amazes me that writers came up with the term a pantzer. It’s not in the dictionary. So what do these things mean?

  • Pantsing refers to sitting down and writing by the seat of your pants, letting it all pour out to see where your creativity takes you. The idea is that if you write forward, the story will appear. And besides, the theory goes, the more you know about what you’re writing beforehand, the less you’ll want to write it.
  • Plotting refers to sitting down and planning out your plot — that is, the surface events in your story — step-by-step, so you know exactly what’s going to happen from the get go.

 

  • Taken from Lisa Crons page with credits at the end of this blog

Personally I would say that I am more of a plotter. Sometimes plotters feel like the second cousins to pantzers as though we are not quite being original when we write. I think the originality is worked out in the plot and the writing is the same for both.

As I have written fantasy and paranormal world building is extremely important so I need to make sure I have continuity so I think that is why I have favoured plotting.

My first fantasy was completely plotted with chapter guidelines and character arcs. It meant I took a lot longer in the planning stages but when it came to writing the book it was quicker.

When I tried to write a book by the seat of my pants I found I needed to go back and change lot of things.

The thing to remember is there is no right or wrong way and these are not the only alternatives.

 

You do what is right for you and remember you are writing because you love it so have fun.

It could also be because you are a masochist who likes to pull your hair out in frustration sometimes, but when you hit the big time you will be able to afford great wigs.

http://writerunboxed.com/2014/03/13/what-both-pantsing-and-plotting-miss-the-real-story/

http://theeditorsblog.net/2011/05/27/the-outline-dilemma-plotting-vs-pantsing/

http://www.write1sub1.com/2012/04/pantsing-plotting-and-hybrids.html

Happy writing


Two things have helped Nicole cope since the murder of her husband. One is running her detective agency, and the other is her guardian angel Mira. When Mira is killed by a demon, Nicole accepts the help of a Ridge, a long haired, cigar smoking diamond in the rough with wings. Things go from bad to worse when a replacement guardian cannot be found. She has to trust Ridge, which is tricky when she realizes there are no demons or angels, just parasitic aliens that humans have built the myths of these celestial beings around. Ridge isn’t an angel or a devil, but an alien half breed known as a Midworlder. He is also way too sexy for his own good, or is it her own good.




Maggie Mundy lives in Adelaide, Australia and is a member of Romance Writers of Australia, and the local chapter SARA (South Australian Romance Authors). She recently completed a Bachelor of Arts in Drama, English and Creative Writing at Flinders University. She had a short story published in the RWA Topaz Anthology Little Gems in 2010 called Sea and Vines. She has two books out with Rogue Phoenix Press. An erotic novella called Blood Scent and a paranormal romance called World Change. She also has a supernatural thriller out with Soul Mate Publishing called Hidden Mortality.

She has also performed for many years in corporate entertainment for which she wrote her own sketches, which probably explains why her head is so full of characters. She loves writing romance but thinks falling in love can be scary, especially in her stories where creatures of the night really exist.



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